Harry Potter’s ‘Cursed Child’ Aims Wand At Broadway

By December 3, 2016
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Harry Potter and the Cursed Child opened to rave reviews and massive ticket sales earlier this year, but the stage production has left many Potter fans out in the cold with its exclusive engagement in London’s West End.

That may be about to change, however, as new reports indicate the show is destined for Broadway in the near future.

Pottermore has confirmed that Cursed Child producers Sonia Friedman and Colin Callender have entered into “detailed talks” to open the show at the Lyric Theater in New York City, with Ambassador Theatre Group financing a multi-million dollar renovation and remodel of the venue tailored to the production’s intimate feel.

Friedman said she “fell in love” with the idea of the theater being designed specifically to suit the show, but cautioned that the deal hasn’t fully come together just yet.

“We are still subject to planning, but assuming we get the go ahead, we will have the theater of our dreams that will be intimate enough for a drama, yet big enough for us to follow in the footsteps of the London production and continue to provide low-priced tickets throughout the auditorium.”

Written by British playwright Jack Thorne and based on a story by Thorne, Rowling and director John Tiffany, Harry Potter and the Cursed Child is set nearly two decades after the events of The Deathly Hallows, and finds a middle-aged Harry working for the Ministry of Magic and trying to forge a better relationship with his son.

The full-length script was published to coincide with the play’s official opening, and sold more than 2 million copies in its first day of release. A “collector’s edition” is expected to hit store shelves next year.

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Brent Hankins

Brent Hankins

Contributing Writer at GeekNation
Brent Hankins is a member of the Phoenix Critics Circle and co-host of the Drinks and Discourse podcast. He's also the proud owner of an Italian Greyhound named Sullivan. He's adorable (the dog, not the author).